Where can I find replacement brushes / heads for the Casabella Smart Scrub bottle brush?

July 27, 2017

I found a replacement that works for these discontinued replacement heads!  The heads fit onto the stem of the Casabella dishwashing brush, and they’re cheaper than what Casabella used to charge!!!  I’ve used the heads now for over a month (and I do dishes at least a few times a day), and they’ve been great!

The replacement heads / refills are the Munchkin 2-piece Shine Stainless Steel bottle brush refills.  They sell on Amazon for $4.49 for two (cheaper than one of the Casabella ones used to be!).  I’ve shown the two brushes below, so you can see the Casabella (green) one is much longer than the Munchkin.  For me, I need the length to wash bottles that are bigger.  But I ordered the full bottle brush from Munchkin, just in case the replacement heads didn’t fit, so I would still be able to use the new brush.  Now, you don’t have to!

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The Casabella brush is all gross in the photo because I’ve just been using it to scrub really dirty pots and pans before I wash them – I couldn’t bear to get rid of it until I found a replacement.

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They have a similar-enough screw-on base to work!

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This is the way the Munchkin refill fits on the Casabella stem.


Pruning your avocado tree?

January 31, 2016

Hi folks!  Wow, it’s been a long time since I posted here.  I hope I remember how to use WordPress (I’m kind of a Tumblr person now).  Anyway, I’ve received so many comments and questions about how to care for avocado trees, that I wanted to post the results of how extreme trimming of my tree Xavier went last year.

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This is how Xavier looked on January 13, 2015, right before I pruned him.

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This is how extreme the pruning was.

Xavier always looks kind of bad in the winter time.  I live in a cold climate, and my home gets very chilly.  There is always a lot of leaf drop when it gets cold, but last winter, I felt like Xavier was getting really unhealthy and needed to “start over.”

I am not an expert on plants or anything, but I have had great luck with Xavier and many of the plants I have, so I decided to give it a try.  I was careful to prune with my clean Felco Pruning Shears to make good cuts.  (I clean the shears with rubbing alcohol after every trim – I can’t tell you whether that’s a good thing for the shears or not – only Felco knows for sure, but that’s what I do.)  I didn’t water him very much at all during this time before the leaves grew back, because I felt he was dormant.

It took many weeks for leaves to grow back, but they grew back abundantly, just as when Xavier was healthiest!

I am proud to report that Xavier looks great.  I just took this photo today (January 31, 2016).  You can see Xavier is a lot healthier this winter than he was last winter.  Sure, there are some brown leaves, and there’s been a bit of seasonal leaf-drop, but still!  Just look at my guy here!  I didn’t add any fertilizer or compost this year, either.  Just water!

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Xavier on January 31, 2016.  Looking good!  (I’ve got to lose that Diamond Armor Minecraft mask I made for my son for Halloween years ago!  JEEZ!)

 

Other avocado tree-related posts of mine:

How to grow an avocado tree from seed

Should I prune my avocado tree?

 

 

 


ALERT: Last day for 18% off EVERYTHING at Other Music.

December 8, 2013

People, it’s the coolest music store in NYC.  18% off everything to celebrate their 18th Anniversary – today (Sunday, Dec 8, 2013) is the last day.  In store and online code is ANNIVERSARY.  Store is at 15 East 4th St (near Lafayette) in Manhattan.  Online at www.othermusic.com.


Alert: The Fiddleheads at Integral Yoga are beautiful!

May 17, 2013

It’s Friday in NYC (and probably everywhere else, too!) and I was just at Integral Yoga.  You bitches know how much I love that place! Check out these fiddleheads!  And, they have the BEST LOOKING GINGER EVER!  And, as usual, everything is organic.  I love you so much, Integral Yoga!  And your produce dudes are THE BEST!

Fiddleheads at Integral Yoga 5_17_13

Look at how tender these are! They were so beautiful!

Fiddleheads

Local. Organic. Expensive. But man, they look good!

Ginger

Look at this ginger! Oh man.

 

 


Alert: gorgeous, organic turmeric at Integral Yoga right now!

April 17, 2013

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I am blogging from IY right now. The turmeric is expensive, but this is the best looking turmeric I’ve ever seen, and it’s organic, people!

Holy crap! They even have organic papaya ( but not much!). If your papaya’s not organic, there’s a good probability it’s GM. Look it up… Papaya is one of the worst for GM.


How do you make dumplings?

March 20, 2013

Pan fried and steamed dumplings

Pan fried and steamed dumplings

Dumplings can be filled with pretty  much anything.  My recipe for 50 pork dumplings is below.  I make 50 at a time because that’s how many wrappers are in a package, and they freeze and reheat well.  I don’t eat dumplings anymore because I don’t eat grains and am on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD), but my family still loves them, so I make them.  At the end of this post, I have notes that include how to make burgers out of dumpling filling for my Paleo, SCD, gluten-free, and grain-free followers out there.

For 50 dumplings (plus extra filling to make 8 paleo /SCD Legal “dumpling filling burgers” – see end of post).

  • 1 package of Nasoya all natural Wonton Wraps (see notes at end as to why I recommend these specifically)
  • 1 lb ground pork (preferably pastured and/or organic)
  • 3/4 of a pound of green cabbage, shredded
  • 2 peeled carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 12-15 shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, chopped (they’re even better if sautéd in butter or ghee first)
  • 2″ piece of ginger, peeled, grated (a microplane does a great job)
  • 5 scallions (mostly green parts), chopped
  • 2 large or jumbo eggs, beaten (plus one extra egg for dumpling filling patties at the end, if you want to make them)
  • 2 TBS coconut flour
  • 1 Tbs of fish sauce (preferably Red Boat fish sauce, due to no sugar, preservatives or extraneous ingredients)
  • 1 Tbs coconut aminos
  • Optional: 4 sunchokes, peeled and chopped (this is to replace the traditional bamboo shoots, which I think are gross when canned – if you could find fresh bamboo shoots, I would use them)
  • few Tbs of butter, ghee, or coconut oil for sautéing (bacon fat is also wonderful… I’m just saying… don’t judge me!)
  • a cup or so of rice flour to generously put on each layer of dumplings so they don’t stick together if you are going to freeze them.

It takes me just over an hour just to fill 50 dumpling wrappers, so set aside around 2 hours for initial prep, filling, and clean up.  It will be worth it when you have a freezer full of quick-to-cook dumplings!

You’ll also need a food processor of at least 8 cup capacity (or you can process in batches), large mixing bowl, smaller bowl, 10-12″ diameter frying pan with lid, flipper, and a little bit of water (both important for steaming and for wetting down the wrapper), a finger bowl, and if you’re freezing most of them, a freezer container with lid (the Pyrex 3 cup container is a perfect fit for approximately 12 of them, and the 6 cup is great for 20-24, depending on how full you fill them).

Though you could close up the dumplings by hand or fork, it is much easier and looks better when you use one of these dumpling presses. I got this one for $3 at Bowery Kitchen at Chelsea Market. If you’re not near Chelsea Market, here are some cheap ones at Amazon: $4.99 one, and a set of 3 for $4.99.

Dumpling Maker

This dumpling maker will save you a ton of time and energy. It’s the best $3 I ever spent!

First, process the cabbage, carrots, mushrooms, grated ginger, scallions (and sunchokes, if you added them), just until the mixture is fairly homogenous.

Then, place the processed mixture in a large mixing bowl.  Add the ground pork, flour, eggs, fish sauce and coconut aminos.  Mix it all together with your hands, like you are making meatballs (you’ve made meatballs, right?).  This way, you don’t overwork the pork, as you would if you put the pork in the food processor (plus, you’d need a bigger food processor).

Dumpling filling workspace

Setting up your workspace properly will make the arduous task of making 50 dumplings go just a bit faster and easier.  Ignore the juicer and the Kitchen Aid.  They just happen to live there.

Next, set up your dumpling-making station.  It will take a while to make 50 dumplings, so only have a little bit of your filling out at a time.  Take about two cups of the mixture out into a small bowl, and put your large bowl with the rest of the filling in the fridge with a cover on it (either a plate or pan lid over the bowl or some plastic wrap or foil).

Place about a tablespoon of the filling in the wrapper and with a wet finger, moisten two consecutive edges with water, fold it over and put it in the dumpling press.  If you don’t have a press, you can squeeze with your fingers, or press down on the edges of the folded dumpling with a fork.

Put the filling in the dumpling wrapper

Put the filling in the dumpling wrapper and moisten the edges, so when you fold it over, it will stick together.

Folded dumpling in dumpling press

Put the folded dumpling in the press and squeeze down, sealing and crimping the edges.

Finished dumpling

This is how the dumpling looks after it is pressed.

Dumplings fit perfectly in the 3 cup Pyrex rectangular storage dish with blue lid.  Don't forget to generously dust with rice flour between layers to prevent sticking.

Dumplings fit perfectly in the 3 cup Pyrex rectangular storage dish with blue lid. Don’t forget to generously dust with rice flour between layers to prevent sticking.

You can boil, steam or pan fry dumplings.  I like them best when they are pan fried with a bit of steaming at the end.  To cook your dumplings my way, heat up a frying pan over medium heat and melt a little less than a tablespoon of butter, ghee, coconut oil, bacon fat or whatever fat you’d like in the pan making sure you coat the whole bottom surface.  Place the dumplings in the pan, ensuring no overlap and turn the heat down to low.  Flip the dumplings, turn the heat back to medium, and let the other side brown (see first picture of this post).  Once both sides are browned, put a tablespoon or so of water in the pan and quickly put the lid on the pan to trap the steam.  This finishes cooking the dumplings as well as softens the consistency of the cooked wrapper a little.  Your dumplings should have an interior temperature of at least 160 degrees F or more.

NOTES:

  • On the wrappers:  I specify Nasoya wrappers instead of most other varieties because they do NOT have sodium benzoate, which I try to avoid when possible.  Tang’s natural dumpling wrappers would be my preferred choice, but they are hard to find.  If you’re looking to make your own gluten-free wrappers, these recipes look great and well-researched.
  • Making “dumpling filling burgers” to maintain your Paleo, SCD, gluten-free, grain-free lifestyle.  Obviously, don’t use the wrappers.  Also, don’t add the sunchokes if you are doing the SCDiet.  Take the leftover filling (around 3 cups, give or take), add another tablespoon of coconut flour and one egg to the mixture and hand-mix.  Form fairly thin burgers (you want them to be able to cook through completely).  In a separate pan from the burgers, with a separate flipper (so you don’t contaminate them with the rice flour/wrappers), sauté in butter, ghee, coconut oil, bacon fat, or your fat of choice  until browned on each side and to an internal temperature of at least 160 degrees F .
Cooking SCD for myself and regular for the family

I’m cooking the dumpling filling burgers on the left and the regular dumplings on the right.

Browned dumpling filling burgers

Browned dumpling filling burgers

If you want to see how I ate these, my plate will be posted in a few days on Yummy Fixins!


How many sheets of normal paper can I send in an envelope with just one stamp?

January 29, 2013

You can send up to 1 ounce via USPS in a regular envelope with one stamp.  This works out to around 5 sheets of “regular” (I used 20 lb 8.5×11) in a #10 (4 1/8 x 9 1/2, “business”) envelope.  That sixth sheet put it over the ounce mark.  How do I know this?  I use an Oxo food scale that I absolutely LOVE!  See the USPS Postage Price Calculator for more info.


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